Image from page 287 of “The story of hedgerow and pond” (1911)

By | November 24, 2017

A few nice best drone pictures images I found:

Image from page 287 of “The story of hedgerow and pond” (1911)
best drone pictures
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Identifier: storyofhedgerowp00lodg
Title: The story of hedgerow and pond
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Lodge, R. B. (Reginald B.) Lodge, George Edward
Subjects: Birds Water birds
Publisher: London, Charles H. Kelly
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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A Tale of Two Martins the pond and the cottage. But whatmade it all look so different ? It seemedto their astonished eyes as if the town,the great noisy, dirty town, had grownsince they had been away—as if ithad stretched out great arms of bricksand mortar, with which it hadswallowed up the green fields and leafylanes that they remembered so well.The pleasant orchards had gone, andthe fields, so quiet and peaceful, had alsogone. And in their place were rowsand rows of new houses. Instead ofthe quiet lane bordered with hawthorn,among which the bees droned andbuzzed, and where the gnats danced inthe sunshine, there was a hideous streetof bright red-brick houses all exactlyalike. At the corner stood a staring-public-house; and outside were two264 A Tale of Two Martins dirty, greasy-looking men grinding awayat a piano-organ, the hideous noise ofwhich drove them away in a fright. However, the cottage was there, thatwas a consolation. And they flew tothe well-known eaves, twittering withd

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Image from page 26 of “All the familiar colloquies of Desiderius Erasmus, of Roterdam, concerning men, manners, and things” (1733)
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Identifier: allfamiliarcollo00eras
Title: All the familiar colloquies of Desiderius Erasmus, of Roterdam, concerning men, manners, and things
Year: 1733 (1730s)
Authors: Erasmus, Desiderius, d. 1536. cn Bailey, N. (Nathan), d. 1742
Subjects: Philosophy
Publisher: London : Printed for J.J. and P. Knapton [etc.]
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Pittsburgh Library System

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rsLucian in a great Meafure helpd to chafe out of the World,by expofing them in their proper Colours. But in a few Generations after him, a new Generation fprungup in the World, well known by the Name of Monksand Friars, differing from the former in Religion, Garb, anda few other Circumftances, but in the main, the fame in-dividual Impoftors J the fame everlafling Cobweb-Spinnersas to their nonfenfical Controverfies, the fame abandondRakehells as to their Morals j but as for the myfterious Artsol heaping up Wealth, and picking the Peoples Pockets, asmuch fuperior to their PredecefTors the Tagan Philofophers,as an overgrown Favourite that cheats a whole Kingdom, isto a common Malefador. Thefe were the fandified Cheats, whofe Follies and VicesErajhms has fo efFedually laflid, that fome Countries haveentirely turnd thefe Drones out of their Cells, and in otherPlaces Where they are flill kept, they are grown contempti-ble to the higheft Degree, and obligd to be always upontheir Guard, THE

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THE Familiar Colloquies OF Desiderius Erasmus, O F R 0 T E R D A M. The Argument. this CfiJloquy teaches Courtefy and Civility in Saluting^who.^ when<i and by what Title ive ought to Salute. At the Firfi Meeting. Certain Perfon teaches, and not without Rea-fon, that [i] we Ihould Salute freely. For acourteous and kind Salutation oftentimes en-gages Friendship, and reconciles Perfons at ivariance, and does undoubtedly nouridi andincreafe a mutual Benevolence. There areindeed fome Perfons that are fuch [2] Churls,and of (o clownifh a Difpohtion, that if you lalute them, theywill fcarcely falute you again. But this Vice is in fome Perfons

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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