Image from page 428 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)

By | December 1, 2017

A few nice best drone pictures images I found:

Image from page 428 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)
best drone pictures
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Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu35medi
Title: Gleanings in bee culture
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Bees Bee culture
Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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pound of honey will beall right in your country; but you will haveto use a shallow brood-chamber in feedingback; for if you dont, three-fourths of thehoney will be wasted. A brood-chamber 5finches wide is deep enough for this purpose.If the bees start to fill a comb I let them fin-ish it. When the brood-chamber is com-posed of combs having none but worker-cells, the bees build drone-combs quite fre-quently, in which nothing is deposited. Thistakes place at swarming time geneially, orwhen nectar comes in slowly.—W. K. M.] A NEW SELF-SPACING FRAME. As there seems to be a lull in the topic offrames just at present, perhaps it is a goodtime for me to add my mite to the mass ofwisdom we now possess concerning the sub-ject. Perhaps I better admit right here thatI am a crank of the crankiest kind, and thatcomb-frames have been a hobby with me fornearly thirty years. We always look with suspicion on newideas, and we often turn down a novelty be-fore we see all there is in it; so please look

Text Appearing After Image:
WAX-PKODUCTION; FEEDING BACK THEHONEY. Mr. W. K. Morrison:—I am always inter-ested in your articles, but I am going to askyou to go a little more into particulars thanyou did in yoiu last article in Gleanings onwax-production. You tell us not to use five. at the little odd-shaped block attached to thecorner of the frame while I tell you a littleabout it. Please notice that it has thirteen plain sur-faces (unlucky number, I know), but for allthat it is easily and quickly made, and whenattached to the frame it takes the place ofthree separate devices in the ordinary frame—a projection by which it is suspended in 1907 GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTURE. 417 the hive, a means by which the frames areproperly spaced, and also to locate the frameslengthwise in the hive. Tney also, by their impact with each oth-er endwise, form a continuous barrier, there-by protecting the rabbets from any accumula-tion of propolis or bee-glue. In fact, theyare in position a closed-end frame in manip-ulation, a loo

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Image from page 500 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)
best drone pictures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu41medi
Title: Gleanings in bee culture
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Bees Bee culture
Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

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Dr. Bruennichs glass box used as a mating-liive. Breediug-case foi- holding four glass mating-ljoxes. the results were so little encouraging. Inthe following years we learned that theblack race was tlie best for our conditions,and we began to deplore the introduction ofthe foreign races; but, unfortunately, itwas almost too late. The greatest part ofthe apiaries were mixed, and it was noteasy to find some colonies which, in conse-quence of their isolated situation, had pre-served their integrity. The question was,Jiow to keep pure those colonies in the midstof all the hybrids. Success was made pos-sible, first, by our glass mating-boxes; and,second, by our mating-stations. The latterare isolated places containing a strong purecolony with a great many drones, and farenough from other apiaries to secure puremating. The more drones there are, espe-cially young and vigorous ones, the greaterthe probability of pure mating. But asthere were many beekeepers who made useof the station it was

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 811 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)
best drone pictures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu41medi
Title: Gleanings in bee culture
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Bees Bee culture
Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

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Text Appearing Before Image:
Imbedding the wires with a hot spur wire-imbedder. The upper wire ispulled down out of line toward the bottom-bar. The next wire is also pulleddown, though not so much. The third wire is left straight. The lower wire ispulled up toward the top-bar. 804 GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTURE

Text Appearing After Image:
On July 23 was held a bee picnic at Gayville, S. D. It was well attended, and some of the vital ques-tions pertaining to apiculture were discussed, such as Bee Diseases, by L. A. Syverud, of Canton, beeinspector for the eastern part of South Dakota; Relation of Bees to Plant Life, by R. A. Morgan; TheProduction of Comb Honey, by J. J. Duffack, of Yankton; Preparing Honey for Market, by W. P.Southworth, of Sioux City, Iowa. The tliircl wire should be about straight. Thefourth, or lower wire, should have all theslack taken up by a decided curve towardthe top-bar. Fig. 6. The upper wires pre-vent stretching of the upper part of thefoundation, thus reducing the tendency onthe part of the bees to build drone-cells nearthe top-bars; and what little sag there is.will not cause the lower half of the founda-tion to buckle, since the lower wires canmove down with it to some extent. The wires can be more rapidly imbeddedif they are left straight; but with a littlepractice it does not take much l

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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