Image from page 24 of “The new Larned History for ready reference, reading and research; the actual words of the world’s best historians, biographers and specialists: a complete system of history for all uses, extending to all countries and subjects and r

By | January 17, 2018

A few nice best drone pictures images I found:

Image from page 24 of “The new Larned History for ready reference, reading and research; the actual words of the world’s best historians, biographers and specialists: a complete system of history for all uses, extending to all countries and subjects and r
best drone pictures
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Identifier: newlarnedhistory12larn
Title: The new Larned History for ready reference, reading and research; the actual words of the world’s best historians, biographers and specialists: a complete system of history for all uses, extending to all countries and subjects and representing the better and newer literature of history;
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Larned, J. N. (Josephus Nelson), 1836-1913 Smith, Donald Eugene, b. 1878 Seymour, Charles, 1885-1963 Shearer, Augustus Hunt, 1878-1941 Knowlton, Daniel Chauncey, 1876-
Subjects: History
Publisher: Springfield, Mass. : C.A. Nichols Publishing Company
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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hed the greatest importance, and theycounter-attacked fiercely for four days. Succes-sive attacks and counter-attacks raged round thecelebrated hill, and we were eventually drivenfrom what remained of the position. To-day thereis no hill—it has been mined out of existence.The weakness of our position in Ypres had alwaysbeen the extent of the Salient, and the fact thatall our communications ran through the city. Thetown itself possessed but little military value, butit was the key of the road to Calais, and had onlya political value in that it was the only remain-ing town of any size left unconquered in Belgium.For political reasons it was essential that not ascrap more of the soil of Flanders should be sur-rendered, although the position was an unfavour-able one for the Allies and a much better line ofdefence could have been sited on the slightlyhigher ground further back. The northern endof the Salient where it touched the Yser Canalwas held by the French Colonial troops; then 9936

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GERMAN GAS ATTACK OX THE WESTERN ERON1, 1915(From the drawing by F. Matania) WORLD WAR, 1915 //. Western Front: cSecond Battle of Ypres WORLD WAR, 1915 came the Canadians. The point o( the Salient,its extreme westerly projection, was held by theiSlh Division, and to the south they linked up«ith Ihe 27lh Division, whose ri^ht Hank abuttedon Mill bo. The first warninK that we had of theiiii|iendinK offensive was the violent spread of theHill CO action; then on Tuesday, the 20th ofApril, a new bombardment started. In Ypreswe were used to lar);e shells, but this was a newand more appalling development of artillery thanwe had ever met with. The enemy opened fireupon the town with the plant 42-centimetre siepemortars—the puns that had crushed Namur andLiipc. Suddenly and without warnini; the bom-bardment bepan. With a dull drone that filledthe air the plant shell could be heard cominp forsome eipht seconds. The noise of its approach stretcher-bearers rose through the hiph-pitchcdcryinp o

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Image from page 789 of “The Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Victoria” (1902)
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Identifier: journalofdepartm10vict
Title: The Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Victoria
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Victoria. Dept. of Agriculture
Subjects: Agriculture Agriculture — Australia Victoria
Publisher: [Melbourne]: Dept. of Agriculture, Victoria
Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden
Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

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titrc, Victoria. [lo Sept., 1912. Summary. I. A well-workfd falldw i)revents much loss of soil-moisture during(Irv wt^ather. J. A fallow may O/.y little good if neglected. 3. A crop leaves the soil extremely dry in the autumn. 4. This lack of moisture must affect the succeeding crop unless the-winter he exceptionally wet. 5. The Australian climate indicates in a special degree the need forfallowing. 6. Land growing a crop may contain only a trace of nitrates. 7. This deficiency may starve a crop. 8. Xitj-ate formation stops when the surface .«oil becomes too dry. 9. A growing crop dries up the surface soil. 10. It is desirable, therefore, that a crop should start with a ready-formed nitrate supply In the soil and sub.soil. II. Such a nitrate supply will also favour a downward development ofthe roots. 12. A well-worked fallow meets the nitrate retjuirement of the succeed-ing crop. 13. Fallowing serves the doul)le purpose of storing soil-moisture and.supplying nitrates. LUCERXE PLANTS.

Text Appearing After Image:
Sam[)les of lucerne plants obtained from a paddock sown nine months-previously in the Rochester irrigation district. They show most eftectivelvthe prolific growth possible on suitable land under proper methods ofirrigation. JO Sept. . 191-.] ntc-kccpiHii ill Viitoria. 529 BEE-KEEPING IN VICTORIA. {Coiifiiiiicd from page 477.) /•. A. Hen line, Bee Kxptrt. Part VII1.—The Lse of Comb-foundation.Cumb-foundation is the base or nii(lril> of the comljs in the frames ofthe modern bee-hive. It consists of a thin sheet of l)eesax impressed onh)Oth sides with the shape of the basis of the cells of honey-comb, and issupi)lied to the liees with the object of obtaining a larger yield of honeythan would be possible were they allowed to build their combs in their ownw.i. The better results obtained by the use of full sheets of comb-founda-tion, instead of a comb-guide or narrow strip of embossed wax, are due tothree factors:—i. A stronger force of worker bees and very few drones. 2. The f

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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