Cool Best Drone Pictures images

By | January 19, 2018

Check out these best drone pictures images:

Image from page 213 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)
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Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu44medi
Title: Gleanings in bee culture
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Bees Bee culture
Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
The A. I. Root Company, Medina, Ohio. GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTURE NOW IS THE TIME To order your supplies, and thushave every thing in readiness forthe spring besides saving 2 per cent We carry a full line of Roots Goods at all times, and are alwaysprepared to fill any and all orders on short notice. Hives, sup^s, frames, sections, comb foundation, section-presses,foundation-fasteners, queen-excluders, queen and drone traps, swarm-catchers, feeders, honey and wax extractors, capping-melters, honey-knives, honey-tanks, honey-packages, shipping-cases, bee-escapes, bee-veils, bee-gloves, bee-brushes, smokers—in short, everything the bee-keeper requires for the proper conduct of an apiary. C. H. W. Weber & Company, Cincinnati, 0. 2146 Central Avenue Beekeepers Prescription Book For Failures,Discouragements, etc. R One Root Catalog giving description and prices from which an order is made out and sent to (Signed) F. A. SALISBURY, Syracuse, New York 1631 West Genesee St. FEBRUARY 15, 1916

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PROTECTION HIVES I Price: .75 for five hives, delivered to any station in the = U. S. east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio Rivers. = Air spaces or packing as you prefer. Seven-eighths 1 material in the outer wall, which means that they 1 will last a lifetime. Used and endorsed as the best i hive on the market by many prominent beekeepers 1 of this and other countries. 1 Norwichtown, Conn., May 24, 1915. (Extract from letter and order): = Our State Agricultural College has just been voted a sum of money to = be used in the construction of an apiarian building and outfit. They = are negotiating with me for some colonies, and 1 will furnish them in h your Protection Hives, for I believe them to be the best on the mar- = ket. ALLEN LATHAM. f Send for catalog and special circulars. We are the s bee-hive people. Send us a list of your require- 1 ments for 1916 and let us figure with you. 1 i A.^G. Woodman Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. | Your BEESWAX Manufactured into Superior Foundat

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Image from page 88 of “Bulletin – United States National Museum” (1877)
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Identifier: bulletinunitedst261883unitfo
Title: Bulletin – United States National Museum
Year: 1877 (1870s)
Authors: United States National Museum Smithsonian Institution United States. Dept. of the Interior
Subjects: Science
Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution Press, [etc.] for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt Print. Off.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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her. PASSERES CLAMATORES TYRANNID^. 77 tions iu spring and fall. It arrives the third week in April and remainsuntil the third week in September. In the spring- it becomes conspicu-ous through the vehement reiteration of its load, harsh, and altogetherpeculiar notes, somewhat resembling the cry of the tree-frog, repeatedfor an hour at a time with intervals of a few minutes whilst the bird isupon its perch in the top of a tree. Unlike most flycatchers, it nests inholes, uses the slough of snakes in the construction of its nest, and laysvery singularly-marked eggs. [3TS 123. (37.) Sayiornis fusca (Gm.) Ld. Pewit Flycatcher; Phoebe-bird;Tom-tit. A common summer resident, but more plentiful in spring and fall,since the greater number pass further north to breed. This is the firstof the spring visitors, arriving before the Swallows and Bluebirds, aboutthe 1st of March. It is very abundant for a month or six weeks, andagain in the fall from the latter part of September until the third week

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 57.—Pewit Flycatcher. in October. It is not specially a woodland bird, like the Gontopus, beingoften found out in weedy fields, by the roadsides, in ravines ; and breedsin caves, about rocks, creeks, and bridges, as well as in out-houses.The very pretty nest, stuccoed with mosses, is affixed by the mud com-posing it to the side of some vertical support; the eggs are white, nor-mally unmarked. [370] 124. (38.) Contopus virens (Linn.) Cab. Wood Pp:wee. A summer resident, extremely abundant in all the woodland. Itarrives the last week in April, becomes numerous in about two weeks,and remains until the third week in September. One can hardly entera piece of woods without being saluted with its plaintive, droning notes;and some individuals regularly nest in the parks within city limits. 78 AVIFAUNA COLUMBIANA. The nest, however, is not easily discovered, being a mossy saucer-likestructure saddled so closely on the bough as to appear like a natural ifl£ A

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