Cool Best Drone Pictures images

By | January 20, 2018

Check out these best drone pictures images:

Image from page 42 of “The Ladies’ home journal” (1889)
best drone pictures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: ladieshomejourna64janwyet
Title: The Ladies’ home journal
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
v-sas

Text Appearing After Image:
/j%i^. aioucE The names of Natcliez homes are partol their romantic flavor. Green Leaves,D Evereijxand Dunleilh: (;iouce-.Ier. Montei-nie. Alonmoiith and Arlino^-ton; LoMfivvoorJ, Lansdowne, Linden, Rosalie, Hope Farm, Stanton Halland Elgin; Richmond, irlie. Mistletoe, and on and on: names and housesornamenting the old town that stands high above the brown Mississippiand decorating the lush snrroimding countryside. Gloucester is a goodbeginning, for it wa> the home of the first territorial governor, a rigidNew Englander, named Winthrop Sargent, who came to this alreadycolorful coirununit about 1800, tried his Yankee best to resist itsblandishments, and finalK gave in to its luxurious <lelights. He now liesburied beneath a great magnolia on the lawn of his house whose Georgianmanner lie might have brought with him from Massachusetts—a stylethat the climate of iNatchez embellished after its own exul)erant fashion. l/ie iipliolslcrcd pieces in the yellow droning room at Glouces

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 241 of “The ABC of bee culture: a cyclopaedia of every thing pertaining to the care of the honey-bee; bees, honey, hives, implements, honey-plants, etc., facts gleaned from the experience of thousands of bee keepers all over our land, and
best drone pictures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: abcofbeeculturec00root
Title: The ABC of bee culture: a cyclopaedia of every thing pertaining to the care of the honey-bee; bees, honey, hives, implements, honey-plants, etc., facts gleaned from the experience of thousands of bee keepers all over our land, and afterward verified by practical work in our own apiary
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Root, A. I. (Amos Ives), 1839-1923
Subjects: Bee culture
Publisher: Medina, Ohio
Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library
Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
but perhaps tlie most general, and theone with wliich we have to do principally, isthe agency of the bees. Common corn is anillustration of a class of plants that bearboth kinds of blossoms on the same stalk. The blossom that bears the seed is low down,and is what we commonly term the silk ofthe ear. The one that bears the pollen is atthe very summit of the stalk, and the pollen,wlien ripe, is shaken off and falls on the silkbelow; or, what is still better, it is waftedby the wind to the silk of the neigliboringstalks, thus preventing in-and-in breeding,in a manner strikingly analogous to the wayin which the drones fly out in the air, thatthe chances may be greatly in favor of theirmeeting queens other than those from theirown hives. You may object, that the silkfrom the ear of corn is not properly a flower,so I will give you a more striking instance.The common ragweed. Ambrosia artemisoe-foUa, also sometimes called bitterweed, orhogweed, bears two distinct and entirelyunlike flowers.

Text Appearing After Image:
r 3^ & ^ ^~j]i .^=^^^^ C RAGWEED AND CORN, SHOWING THE TW^OKINDS OF BLOSSOMS ON ONE STALK. On the ends of the tall racemes, as at B,the pollen-bearing blossoms are seen veryconspicuously; and many of you who are fa-miliar with the weed, perhaps never imag-ined that it had any other blossom at all: ifso, will you please go outdoors and take alook at them again? Right close to the mainstem, where the branches all start out, youwill find a very pretty little flower, only thatit possesses no color except green, and it ishere where ail the seeds are borne, as youwill see on some of the branches where theyare matured. Now, if you will get up earlyin the morning, you will find that theseplants, when shaken, give off a little cloudof fine green dust, and this is the pollen ofthe plant. Before I knew what it was, I usedto find it annoying on account of the wayin which it soiled light clothing. As thisplant is in no way dependent on the bees forthe fertilization of its blossoms, they con-

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *