Image from page 343 of “Childe Harold’s pilgrimage : a romaunt” (1869)

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Image from page 343 of “Childe Harold’s pilgrimage : a romaunt” (1869)
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Identifier: haroldspilgram00byro
Title: Childe Harold’s pilgrimage : a romaunt
Year: 1869 (1860s)
Authors: Byron, George Gordon Byron, Baron, 1788-1824 Skelton, Percival
Subjects:
Publisher: London : John Murray
Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute
Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

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h some small but beautiful woods ; one of these was named the Bosquet deJulie; and it is remarkable that, though long ago cut down by the brutalselfishness of the monks of St. Bernard (to whom the land appertained), thatthe ground might be enclosed into a vineyard for the miserable drones of anexecrable superstition, the inhabitants of Clarens still point out the spot whereits trees stood, calling it by the name which consecrated and survived them.Rousseau has not been particularly fortunate in the preservation of the localhabitations he has given to airy nothings. The Prior of Great St. Bernardhas cut down some of his woods for the sake of a few casks of wine, andBuonaparte has levelled part of the rocks of Meillerie in improving the road tothe Simplon. The road is an excellent one; but I cannot quite agree with aremark which I heard made, that La route vaut micux que les souvenirs. Page 177. Of names irhich unto you bequeathd a name.Voltaire and Gibbon. childe harolds pilgrimage 321

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VCI.TATRfcS HOUSE AT FFRNEY Page 181. Had I not filed my mind, which thus itself subdued. If it be thus, For Banqnos issue have I filed my mind.—Macbeth. Page 181. Oer others griefs that some sincerely grieve. It is said by Rochefoucault that there is always something in the misfortunesof mens best friends not displeasing to them. NOTES TO CANTO FOURTH.Page 194. She looks a sea Cybele, fresh from ocean. Sabellicus, describing the appearance of Venice, has made use of the aboveimage, which would not be poetical were it not true— Quo fit ut qui superneurbem contempletur, turritam telluris imaginem medio Oceano figuratam seputet inspicere. 322 childe harolds pilgrimage Page 197. Sparta hath many a, worthier son than he. The answer of the mother of Brasidas, the Lacedaemonian general, to thestrangers who praised the memory of her son. Page 199. The Planter of the Lion,1 which through fire. That is, the Lion of St. Mark, the standard of the republic, which is theorigin of the word Pant

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Image from page 149 of “Natural history of animals;” (1895)
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Identifier: naturalhistoryo00tenn
Title: Natural history of animals;
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors: Tenney, Sanborn, 1827-1877 Tenney, Abby Amy Gove, 1836-
Subjects: Zoology
Publisher: New York, Cincinnati [etc.] American book company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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llecting honey. The females have either a sting ora piercer for laying their eggs. They surpass all otherInsects in the number and variety of their instincts.The word Hymenopter means membrane-winged. Bees. Bees have a hairy body, and their lower lip is length-ened into a sort of proboscis, which is jointed and can 144 ARTHROPODS : INSECTS. be folded under the head; the first joint of the hindlegs is often very large, and fitted for collecting andcarrying the pollen of flowers. The Hive or Honey Bee is originally from Asia, buthas now spread over Europe and America. It is seenalmost everywhere in hives, and it is also quite com,mon in a wild state, and often far from human dwell-ings. In a wild state, Bees of this kind have thenhome in hollow trees and in clefts of rocks. In everynest or hive there are three kinds, a female or queen,males or drones, and workers. In a well-stocked hivethere are two thousand males, fifty thousand workers,but only one queen. The workers are the smallest;

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Fig. 254.—Queen. Fig. 255. — Worker. Fig. 256. — Drone. Hive Bee. they fly over the surrounding country and collect allthe materials to form the structure called the comb;they build the cells and store them with honey; theyfeed and protect the young; they wait upon thequeen ; they do all the work of the hive. The malesor drones have a thicker body, and no sting; they per-form no labor, but are supported by the workers. Thequeen is much larger than the others, has a sting, andis the sole mistress of the hive. She lays all the eggs,and seldom goes out except to lead a swarm. Thehoneycomb is one of the most interesting of insect HYMENOPTERA: BEES. 145 structures, and is arranged in the hive in the mostregular manner. The cells are six-sided, and are builtin just the shape to save all the room, to be thestrongest, to contain the greatest amount of honey,and to require the least amount of wax in their con-struction. There are certain cells in which the queen lays hereggs, depositing

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